FAA Reviewing Passenger Use of Electronic Devices

May 21, 2013 by  
Filed under Features

With electronic devices firmly entrenched as part of daily lives for many travelers, airlines are under pressure to allow passengers to use their tablets, laptops, smartphone, e-readers and other devices without restriction during flights. In the United States, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been working on a set of regulations to govern the use of these devices on airplanes, but is reportedly far from ready to put any new rules into action, with the delay being attributed to the authority’s desire to put into place a concise set of regulations to deal with current, and even future, technology.

A year ago, the industry working group set up by the FAA noted that, faced with evolving electronic technology, the FAA was reviewing the use of personal electronic devices, excluding the use of cellphones, on aircraft. A full year later the FAA appears to be no closer to resolving the issue and this has drawn sharp criticism from some quarters. Among the critics is Senator Clair McCaskill (D-MO) who recently announced her plans to circumvent the FAA and introduce legislation allowing passengers the freedom to use their electronic devices throughout a flight.

The increasing number of different types of electronic devices brought by passengers onto airplanes is adding to the difficulty of drafting a set of standard regulations. The FAA working group needs to include all these devices and take into account the different modes of operation they offer. Currently a number of electronic devices include an “airplane mode” option, which generally means that they do not send or receive wireless signals, but this is not necessarily standard across all devices with this option. Also, there is concern that FAA’s desire to have rules that will apply to devices of the future may not be realistic given the speed at which technology is developing. The group has apparently also noted concerns over expecting already busy flight attendants to police the use of various devices.

The initial concern with the use of electronic devices on flights addressed, among other things, the issue of possible interference with electronic signals pilots rely on for safe flight. To date, the FAA reportedly has no record of aviation accidents caused by interference from personal electronic devices. Flight attendants note that their main concern is that passengers should not be using electronic devices when the safety measures are presented at the beginning of the flight, as they need to hear and understand what should be done in the event of an emergency.

The FAA anticipates a final report from the working group later this year, with rule changes being implemented by the end of 2013.

Grand Canyon West Rim Air Adventure 2010

April 20, 2010 by  
Filed under Events

To enjoy a unique day trip adventure, book a Grand Canyon West Rim Air Adventure excursion, which is bound to be very memorable. Visitors can be collected by shuttle bus from any hotel in Las Vegas and be transported in a fixed wing aircraft to the Grand Canyon West Rim. The flight lasts approximately forty minutes, which is followed by a ride in a helicopter, which descents to the floor of the canyon. Visitors will also be treated to a boat ride, a tasty barbeque lunch and a visit to the Eagle Point Indian Village.

Inquiries in regard to this magnificent day trip can be made at your hotel, or the local tour operator. The trip is available every day, although departure times are subject to change, depending on the season.

Date: 30 April 2010
Venue: Grand Canyon
City: Las Vegas
Country: United States of America

China Airports

February 9, 2009 by  
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China is one of the largest and most populous nations in the world with more than one hundred different ethnic groups. The country has a vast and varying geography ranging from flatland in the east to large mountains and plateaus in the west. There are also many rivers around the country like the Mekong and Pearl River in the south of China. Here, over 1.3 billion people live, approximately a fifth of the entire world’s population, making it quite an experience to see just how so many people live together and the technological advances made to ease this reality.

The main airport can be found in Beijing, the capital city of the People’s Republic of China. The International Beijing Capital Airport will probably be the airport that you find yourself using if you visit this fast moving country. When the Beijing Capital Airport was first constructed it was not easily accessible, with only one narrow road from the Sanyuanqiao area. Now, of course, this has all changed and in place of this narrow road is a twenty km Airport Expressway.

Another major airport that you will find in the western part of Shanghai is the Shanghai Hongqiao Airport, which is one of two airports in this city. The other airport is the Shanghai Pudong International Airport ,which was built at the end of the 1990s. The Hongqiap Airport was used for international flights before the Shanghai Pudong airport was built, but today it is used basically for domestic flights. From most of these international airports you will find alternative transport like taxis and minibuses to take you to and around Shanghai.

Airports in China:

Mykolaiv International Airport

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Mykolaiv International Airport is about 56 meters or 183 feet above mean sea level and its position is 47 degrees 03′ 28″N, 031 degrees 55′ 11″E. The Airport is a public airport that serves the city of Mykolaiv in the Ukraine. The Mykolaiv International has two runways – one with an asphalt surface while the other has a grass surface. The asphalt surface runway is 8,438 feet or 2,572 meters long and the grass surface runway is 5,905 feet or 1,800 meters long.

In the whole of the South of Ukraine, the Mykolaiv International is considered one of the biggest airports. It is also recognized for the advanced and extensive technology that it is equipped with. This State owned enterprise is listed as a Class B airport, which means that all operations must be conducted by VFR (visual flight rule), IFR and SVFR flight rules. ATC is held responsible for clearing all aircraft and must separate each flight from one another. Like Mykolaiv airport in Ukraine, the whole world’s navigable airspace is basically divided into three categories and are allocated a specific class, either class A, B or C.

The Mykolaiv International Airport has a modern runway that can handle aircraft weighing as much as 220 tons when they land there. The runway can also hold a total of eight “Ilyushin IL-76” aircraft that have an array of lighting, navigation and radio technology. These strategic air lifters have four engines and were designed in the Soviet Union, although now they can be found throughout Africa, Eastern Europe and Asia. At the Air terminal complex there are about 400 passengers that go through every hour on domestic flights and only about 100 passengers coming through on international flights.

Haneda Airport (Tokyo International)

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Tokyo International Airport services the Greater Tokyo Area and deals mostly with the domestic flights. The name Haneda Airport was given to the Tokyo International Airport after the Narita International Airport was opened. The Narita International Airport was previously known as the New Tokyo International Airport, which caused some confusion. After the opening of Narita, most of Haneda’s international traffic was diverted to the new airport, thus leaving the Tokyo International Airport, concentrating mainly on the domestic traffic. Neverthless, the airport still deals with approximately 60 million passengers annually, and is therefore one of the busiest airports in the world.

The Haneda Airport was opened as the Haneda Aerodrome in 1931, and at the time, it was the biggest civilian airport in Japan. As with many airports during war time, the Haneda Aerodrome became the Haneda Army Air Base in 1945, as an United States military facility. Japan received half the airport back in 1952, which was named the Tokyo International Airport. The entire airport was given back to Japan in the year 1958. During the 1960s, airlines such as Sabena, Cathay Pacific Airways, Pan Am, Air Siam and Swissair began running frequent flights to the Haneda Airport. In 1961 the instrument landing systems were installed on the Haneda Airport runways.

Haneda Airport operates out of three Terminals. Terminal 1 is nicknamed the ‘Big Bird’, and was opened for use in 1993. The new six story building, complete with shopping areas, observation deck, banks, gift shops and other facilities, replaced the older and smaller terminal that was constructed in 1970. In December 2004, the Haneda Airport unveiled Terminal 2, which features a variety of shops, restaurants, market place and an open-air restaurant that is located on the roof. The Haneda Excel Tokyo Hotel is also situated in this amazing six-story structure. Terminal 3 is a much smaller building and is responsible for chartered, international flights that run between Haneda and the Seoul Gimpo Airport. Haneda also takes care of charter flights during the hours that Narita is not open.

Haneda Airport has three runways, which are all paved and are used for both take-off and landings. The 16R/34L is 3000 meters in length, as is the 16L/34R, with the shorter 4/22 runway being 2 500 meters in length. Transport to and from the Haneda Airport, or Tokyo International Airport, is serviced by the railway service, monorail service and buses.

Managua International Airport

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Managua International Airport was formerly known as the Las Mercedes International Airport when it opened in 1968. It was later renamed to Augusto C. Sandino International Airport at the time of the Sandista regime. In the 1970s the airport building was remodeled to offer background music, air conditioning, restaurants and conveyors belts. The changes also brought about the recruitment of customs inspectors, health inspectors and immigration officers. By 1975, the airport was able to accommodate three airplanes simultaneously, and led to airlines such as Airline of Nicaragua, Pan Am Airlines, Lanica Airlines and Iberia Airlines to operate flights to and from this airport in Nicaragua. Refurbishments were done to airport in 1996, and it was renamed to the Managua International Airport.

This airport in Nicaragua is managed by the EAAI,or Empresa Administradora de Aeropuertos Internacionales. Many factors such as alliances, airline infrastructure and globalization have led to the success of the air traffic industry. The EAAI have broadened their outlook on future of the Managua International Airport by implementing long term and short term goals and strategies.

The Managua International Airport has one asphalt runway that is 2 442 meters in length, and can easily accommodate airplanes such as Boeing 767’s, Boeing 707’s, DC10’s, Boeing 727’s, Boeing 757’s and the Boeing 737’s. The airport employs about 350 Nicaraguans, who oversee and assist the daily running of the airport and create a safe and pleasant environment for passengers. Airlines that have flights running to and from the airport include Delta Air Lines, TACA, Air Transat, Copa Airlines, American Airlines, Continental Airlines and Aero Caribbean.

The facilities in the terminal of the Managua International Airport include restaurants, banking facilities, gift shops and postal services. Taxi, bus and shuttle services are available to passengers to get to the airport, or to leave the airport by. Car rental companies such as Argus Car Hire are located in the airport building.

Beijing Capital International Airport

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Beijing Capital International Airport is located in the People’s Republic of China, and is approximately 25 kilometers outside the city center of Beijing. Within China, the Beijing Capital International Airport is not only the biggest airport in China, but also the busiest. It first opened its doors on 2 March 1958 and is under the control and management of the Civil Aviation Administration of China. Passenger traffic and air traffic has increased to such an extent that the Beijing Airport now sees an average of 33 million passengers pass through its doors every year. The Beijing Airport facilitates over 5 000 scheduled flights to 88 destinations within China, and 69 international flights.

The airport has 3 impressive terminals. Terminal 1 came into operation on 1 January 1980. Construction on Terminal 2 ended in 1999, after which Terminal 1 was closed for renovation to replace the old 1980’s building. Up until the completion of Terminal 2, the Beijing Airport only had the use of one terminal. In 2004, a new and modern Terminal 1 was back in business, taking responsibility for the domestic flights and international traffic. The new terminal is 60 000 square feet, has ten boarding gates and can accommodate 60 daily flights. It also has car parks and a parking apron.

The airport’s secondary terminal, Terminal 2, is 336 000 square meters in size and it is equipped with all the latest technology and equipment. Terminal 2 was designed to accommodate approximately 26.5 million passengers a year and currently deals with domestic and international flights. Terminal 3 was completed in in 2008. It houses a number of major international airlines, as well as Air China. Interestingly, Terminal 3 is bigger than all 5 of London Heathrow Airport’s 5 terminals combined.

At present, the Beijing Capital International Airport has two asphalt runways that are 3 200 meters and 3 800 meters, respectively. The third runway is constructed from concrete and measures 3 800 meters. Facilities that are available throughout the terminals include public telephones, fast food outlets, clinics, banks, smoking areas, restrooms, commercial centers and restaurants.

Odessa International Airport

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Odessa International Airport can be found in Odessa in Ukraine and was built in 1961, providing both domestic and international flights. Odessa is considered the fourth largest city in Ukraine, being home to more than a million people, and serves as an important port on the Black Sea. As a public airport, the Odessa International Airport’s official ICAO code is UKOO, with its allocated airport code being ODS and its World Area Code is 488.

The airport’s elevation above mean sea level is 172 feet or 53 meters. The airport has two runways – one measuring about 9,186 feet or 2,799 meters long consisting partly of concrete, with the other consisting of grass and measuring 1,815 feet or 553 meters long. These runways are shared by the country’s Air Force. The longitude of Odessa airport is 30 degrees 37’0″E and a latitude of 46 degrees 30’0″N.

The Odessa trade seaport was a very important trade port for the U.S.S.R during the Soviet period but now has very little military interference. Odessa seaport is considered a warm water port and so are its counterparts Yuzhny, an international oil terminal, and Illichivs’k all of which symbolize a very important transportation junction. The beautiful architecture that can be found in Odessa has a taste of the Mediterranean, not as one would expect considering it is a Ukrainian city. Odessa is a lovely city to visit, and those who fly into Ukraine via the Odessa International Airport will find that Odessa is a fascinating melting pot of cultures, languages and backgrounds.

Narita International Airport

February 9, 2009 by  
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Japan’s Narita International Airport (NRT) is located in the town of Narita, which forms part of the eastern section of Greater Tokyo. Its coordinates are: 35º45’50″N, 140º23’30″E. This exceptional airport handles chiefly international flights in the area, whilst Haneda Airport deals with Tokyo’s domestic flights. Formerly called New Tokyo International Airport, Narita Airport is the country’s second most busy passenger airport and the busiest air cargo center. The airport serves as an important connection for flights between the Americas and Asia. Japanese law states that Narita International Airport is a first class airport.

Narita International Airport in Tokyo was opened in May of 1978. Since that time it has seen dramatic growth and has played a vital role in creating international awareness for Japan. This well-designed airport is a grand gateway to a unique Japanese experience, opening up the country’s beautiful islands for travelers. Narita Airport boasts 2 paved runways. The first (4 000m) runs in a 16R/34L direction, whilst the second (2 180m) runs in a 16L/34R direction. The airport has 2 terminals. Terminal 1 handles North American and European air traffic. Terminal 2 is used chiefly by Asian carriers. A broad spectrum of flights depart from and arrive at Narita Airport, carrying passengers from around the world. Terminal 1 and 2 stand about 1 mile apart, however, a convenient shuttle bus provides regular transportation between the two.

Tokyo Narita International Airport offers top facilities for travelers. For their convenience there are banks, a post office, ATMs, bureaux de change, internet, business services and mobile phone hire. Also useful are the medical clinics, nurseries, a dentist, sleeping rooms, showers and children’s entertainment areas. Those who wish to dine or grab a quick beverage can make use of the numerous restaurants, coffee shops, bars and fast-food outlets. Passengers can use extra time to engage in some shopping at Narita Airport’s jewelers, bookshops, souvenir shops, clothing stores and others. Airport parking at Narita Airport is excellent with both short-term and long-term parking facilities.

Getting to and from the airport is no hassle at all. There are a variety of car hire agents at Narita International Airport. Both Terminal 1 and Terminal 2 have railway stations. Extensive taxi and limousine services are available as are shuttle buses. Narita International Airport is certainly worthy of its title as First Class Airport.

Norway Airports

February 9, 2009 by  
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With almost a hundred different airports scattered across the country, Norway is an easy place to get around. Even the most remote parts of the country seem closer when accessed by an airplane. So, while you contemplate your travels in this incredibly scenic, peace-loving country, make sure that you consider all your options before deciding on a destination.

The two most popular airports in Norway are likely the Haugesund International Airport and the Oslo International Airport – the country’s two major international gateways. Since the Haugesund Airport is the lesser known and utilized of the two, it is the best place to get discounts on aviation fees and cheap flights. It is situated on the west side of the island and is one of the best airports to use if you are planning to fly to one of the country’s smaller destinations. Oslo Airport, on the other hand, is the second largest airport in Scandinavia. In 2006 some 17.7 million passengers passed through its doors giving it the distinction of being Scandinavia’s fastest growing airport. The airport is well built and has great facilities as well as plenty of domestic and international flight options.

When traveling to Norway one needs to remember to pack in a valid passport to identify yourself, and your country of origin, to customs officials. It is also a good idea to keep in mind the fact that the country employs Daylight saving time between the months of March and October to make better use of the longer daylight hours during the longer summer months, so if you are traveling during this time you must remember to set your clock one hour forward. Also, you should remember that while Norway enjoys relatively mild weather for a country with its latitude, you should always pack a variety of clothing to cater to all occasions – clothes that can be layered are preferable. This can include cool daytime wear if you are traveling during summer or waterproof trousers if you are visiting during spring. So make sure that you come prepared and you may just enjoy one of the most beautiful holidays ever!

Airports in Norway:

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