FAA Reviewing Passenger Use of Electronic Devices

May 21, 2013 by  
Filed under Features

With electronic devices firmly entrenched as part of daily lives for many travelers, airlines are under pressure to allow passengers to use their tablets, laptops, smartphone, e-readers and other devices without restriction during flights. In the United States, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been working on a set of regulations to govern the use of these devices on airplanes, but is reportedly far from ready to put any new rules into action, with the delay being attributed to the authority’s desire to put into place a concise set of regulations to deal with current, and even future, technology.

A year ago, the industry working group set up by the FAA noted that, faced with evolving electronic technology, the FAA was reviewing the use of personal electronic devices, excluding the use of cellphones, on aircraft. A full year later the FAA appears to be no closer to resolving the issue and this has drawn sharp criticism from some quarters. Among the critics is Senator Clair McCaskill (D-MO) who recently announced her plans to circumvent the FAA and introduce legislation allowing passengers the freedom to use their electronic devices throughout a flight.

The increasing number of different types of electronic devices brought by passengers onto airplanes is adding to the difficulty of drafting a set of standard regulations. The FAA working group needs to include all these devices and take into account the different modes of operation they offer. Currently a number of electronic devices include an “airplane mode” option, which generally means that they do not send or receive wireless signals, but this is not necessarily standard across all devices with this option. Also, there is concern that FAA’s desire to have rules that will apply to devices of the future may not be realistic given the speed at which technology is developing. The group has apparently also noted concerns over expecting already busy flight attendants to police the use of various devices.

The initial concern with the use of electronic devices on flights addressed, among other things, the issue of possible interference with electronic signals pilots rely on for safe flight. To date, the FAA reportedly has no record of aviation accidents caused by interference from personal electronic devices. Flight attendants note that their main concern is that passengers should not be using electronic devices when the safety measures are presented at the beginning of the flight, as they need to hear and understand what should be done in the event of an emergency.

The FAA anticipates a final report from the working group later this year, with rule changes being implemented by the end of 2013.

Grand Canyon West Rim Air Adventure 2010

April 20, 2010 by  
Filed under Events

To enjoy a unique day trip adventure, book a Grand Canyon West Rim Air Adventure excursion, which is bound to be very memorable. Visitors can be collected by shuttle bus from any hotel in Las Vegas and be transported in a fixed wing aircraft to the Grand Canyon West Rim. The flight lasts approximately forty minutes, which is followed by a ride in a helicopter, which descents to the floor of the canyon. Visitors will also be treated to a boat ride, a tasty barbeque lunch and a visit to the Eagle Point Indian Village.

Inquiries in regard to this magnificent day trip can be made at your hotel, or the local tour operator. The trip is available every day, although departure times are subject to change, depending on the season.

Date: 30 April 2010
Venue: Grand Canyon
City: Las Vegas
Country: United States of America

Christchurch International Airport

February 9, 2009 by  
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If you are planning to travel to New Zealand’s southern island, Christchurch International Airport is your most likely place of arrival. It is Christchurch’s main airport and is located just 12 kilometers northwest of the city center in a small suburb known as Harewood. The airport caters to both domestic and international flights, but is also used for cargo transportation on a small scale. Garden City Helicopters is based right next to the airport, though they have several helipads around the city in strategic locations. The city’s other main helicopter service, Christchurch Helicopters, operates from the western side of the airfield near the Canterbury Aero Club’s grass runway. Though expensive, helicopter transportation provides much easier access to some of the more rugged parts of the country as well as to small cities and towns should you be in a hurry or not able to travel in a more conventional manner.

The Christchurch International Airport is a public airport that is currently operated by Christchurch International Airport Limited. It mainly serves the city of Christchurch though it may also act as an access point to South Island for international passengers. It is situated at a somewhat higher elevation than its northern counterpart, the Auckland Airport, at 123 ft (37 m). The main airport makes use of two different runways. The Primary Runway is 10 785 ft (3 287 m) in length while the Secondary Runway is a much shorter 5 712 ft (1 741 m) in length. Both feature an asphalt surface. The Secondary Runway crosses the Primary Runway at a ninety degree angle to allow aircraft to take off in adverse wind conditions. There is also a much smaller grass surfaced runway running parallel to the Primary runway. This runway is used by the Aeroclub and measures 1 690 ft (515 m) in length.

There are two main terminals – the domestic and international terminals. The domestic terminal has 5 jet ways while the international terminal has 9. The Christchurch International Airport has also been used for military aircraft in the past, though it continues to serve primarily as a public airport.

Those traveling to and from the airport may make use of taxi and shuttle services as well as the three city bus routes that service the airport. For those with their own vehicles there is a Short Term Carpark and a Multi-level Carpark.

Vancouver International Airport

February 9, 2009 by  
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Vancouver International Airport is located approximately 15 kilometers outside of the city of Vancouver in Canada. Second to the Toronto Pearson International Airport, this Canadian airport is extremely busy and accommodates domestic traffic as well as flights to the United States, Caribbean, Asia and to Europe. Throughout the last few years, the traffic to this airport has increased dramatically, with 15.7 million passengers recorded in 2004, 16.4 million passengers in 2005 and 16.9 million in 2006. Approximately 60 000 passengers depart and arrive at this airport daily. This Canadian airport is one of the eight airports in Canada that has facilities to service Border Pre-clearance for the United States.

The Vancouver International Airport operates from three active terminals. The terminal for the International and Domestic flights is housed in one building, but has been divided into two sections. The building that is home to the Domestic traffic was constructed in 1968 but underwent complete renovations to improve the facilities and services. The addition to the building, to house the International traffic, was built in the 1990s. The South Terminal is completely separate, and accommodates the regional airlines. The regional airlines operate in British Columbia for the most part.

There are four runways at the Vancouver Airport. The 08L/26R runway is made from concrete and has a length of 3 029 meters; while the 08R/26L is constructed from asphalt and concrete and has length of 3 505 meters. Runway 12/30 is 2 225 meters in length and is constructed from asphalt and concrete; and the last runway, the 26A, is constructed from concrete and has a length of 1 066 meters. The Vancouver Airport has also installed the Tarsier Foreign Objects Debris system to their runways. This is radar system that can detect debris on the runways no matter what the weather conditions are. They were the very first in the world of commercial airports to have installed and operate this system.

The Vancouver Airport has approximately 400 businesses on their premises that not only employ 26 000 people, but also accommodate international trade. Businesses that are housed here are not only situated at the airport for commerce purposes, but provide services to passengers. Facilities such as book stores, convenience stores, sport shops, gift shops, food stores, pharmacies, dental clinics, medical clinics, postal services, ATMs, banks, foreign exchange services, barbers and even dry cleaning services are available, to name a few.

Transport from the Vancouver International Airport and to the airport is available through taxis, buses and limousines. Parking areas are conveniently situated for passengers that arrive in their own vehicles, and the airport, including the parking area and some taxis, are wheelchair accessible.

Phuket International Airport

February 9, 2009 by  
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Phuket International Airport is located in Phuket, providing flights for people in that area as well as from abroad. You will find Phuket in one of the southern provinces of Thailand. The name of the island and of the international airport is taken from the word Bukit, which is Malay, and means mountain. This is because the island is mainly made up of mountain ranges and from a distance it looks like one complete mountain. The airport is only 32 km from downtown Phuket and transport is easily accessible to take you around.

Phuket International is a relatively small public airport and is operated by the Airports of Thailand Public Co. Ltd. The airport is about 25 meters or 82 feet above mean sea level and its coordinates are 08 degrees 06’48″N and 98 degrees 19’01″E. The Phuket International airport has only one runway made from asphalt, being 3,000 meters or 9,843 feet long and 45 meters wide. In Thailand, Phuket airport is ranked second in the amount of passengers and cargo it processes, which has a lot to do with the spectacular beaches and tourist attractions that the island has.

Phuket International Airport services ten different airlines and can handle more then 2,900,000 passengers as well as 12,000 tons of cargo a year. Every hour approximately 10 flights take off, so regular flights internationally and domestically are provided out of Thailand’s biggest island and to other provinces in Thailand. The airport accommodates many different tourists from around the world who enjoy Phuket’s Sino-Portuguese architecture and of course the world-famous beaches.

While you are enjoying the many attractions of Phuket don’t forget to make time to visit the other surrounding islands, namely Koh Phi Phi and the Similan Islands. There you can do a variety of underwater excursions and take time to view the beautiful marine on your day trip out there. If you are planning a trip to the island in October then look out for the Vegetarian Festival where you can sample a variety of non-meat delicacies while enjoying the entertainment provided there.

Japan Airports

February 9, 2009 by  
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Japan is a wonderful country to visit, with many different activities and sights to do and see. With Japan being so accessible by plane and other forms of transport, it is definitely a must if you want an exciting trip. There are many airports to make traveling to all the cities you may want to explore a convenient and speedy experience. Kansai International Airport, or Osaka Airport, is a phenomenal airport to fly into as it is situated on an artificial island on the Osaka Bay. It is off the shore of the Sennan district in Japan’s Osaka.

If the Narita, Chiba area in Japan is where you want to visit then you will need to use the Narita International Airport, which is found in the eastern part of the Greater Tokyo area. Another airport that also serves the Greater Tokyo Area is the New Tokyo International Airport, found in Ota, Tokyo, Japan. The New Tokyo airport is also known as Haneda Airport to distinguish it from Narita airport, as they are both main airports that serve that area. Narita International does most of the international flights, where as Haneda Airport focuses mainly on domestic with only one international flight to Gimpo International Airport in Seoul, South Korea.

If you do manage to visit Japan here are a few of the things you should look out for to make your holiday all the more worthwhile. One of the more popular forms of entertainment throughout the country is the Amusement and theme parks, which there are many to choose from. One in particular is the Tokyo Disney Resort. For less commercial entertainment you can go see the natural, mineral hot springs, and there are many of them, for a relaxing swim and where you can enjoy the beautiful natural surroundings while gaining different health benefits. Then there is Japanese pop music you can look more into or Enka, which is focused on more the older Japanese generation. If getting more involved is more your thing, Japan also has Karaoke bars and there are slot machines and pinball for the youngsters.

Airports in Japan:

Corn Island Airport

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Corn Island Airport, as the name suggests, is situated on Corn Island, of Nicaragua. The little airport has recently had renovations done that included the construction of a new terminal and refurbishments to the airport runway. Due to the size of the airport, it during the business hours of 6:30 in the morning until 5:30 in the afternoons. Air traffic at this airport in Nicaragua is controlled from an air traffic control tower that operates on two communication systems, namely the HF land-land radio system and the VHF land-air radio systems. These systems allow the tower to safely guide aircraft in and out of the airport. The Corn Island Airport is very important to the infrastructure of the island, and the renovations that were done included boarding platforms to the air terminal and cargo area. The newly renovated terminal has the passenger capacity of approximately a hundred passengers.

This airport in Nicaragua has one runway that is constructed from asphalt and is thirty meters in width and has a length of 1 450 meters. The runway at Corn Island Airport is able to accommodate a diverse range of different aircraft. The Let 410’s, AN26’s, Cessna Grand Caravans and Short 360’s can safely and easily navigate the runway. The smallest commercial aircraft that are dealt with at the Corn Island Airport is the L4T. This aircraft has the seating capacity of 21 passengers. There are currently only two aircraft carriers that operate daily flights from Corn Island to Bluefields and Managua. These two airlines are Atlantic Airlines and La Costena. Charter flights are also available from the Corn Island Airport, and are flown in a range of aircrafts. Small aircrafts usually fly six times a week.

The air terminal has been equipped with a variety of features such as a boarding area, an immigrations and customs division, administration offices, offices for the use of the airlines, metal detectors, X-ray equipment, DEA offices and a fire station. Parking bays have also been added to the airport, and can accommodate approximately thirty to forty vehicles at a time. Transportation to and from the airport is available in the form of taxis and buses. With tourism playing such a huge role in the economy of many Caribbean islands, the renovation of the Corn Island Airport will ensure the safe and comfortable travel of passengers.

China Airports

February 9, 2009 by  
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China is one of the largest and most populous nations in the world with more than one hundred different ethnic groups. The country has a vast and varying geography ranging from flatland in the east to large mountains and plateaus in the west. There are also many rivers around the country like the Mekong and Pearl River in the south of China. Here, over 1.3 billion people live, approximately a fifth of the entire world’s population, making it quite an experience to see just how so many people live together and the technological advances made to ease this reality.

The main airport can be found in Beijing, the capital city of the People’s Republic of China. The International Beijing Capital Airport will probably be the airport that you find yourself using if you visit this fast moving country. When the Beijing Capital Airport was first constructed it was not easily accessible, with only one narrow road from the Sanyuanqiao area. Now, of course, this has all changed and in place of this narrow road is a twenty km Airport Expressway.

Another major airport that you will find in the western part of Shanghai is the Shanghai Hongqiao Airport, which is one of two airports in this city. The other airport is the Shanghai Pudong International Airport ,which was built at the end of the 1990s. The Hongqiap Airport was used for international flights before the Shanghai Pudong airport was built, but today it is used basically for domestic flights. From most of these international airports you will find alternative transport like taxis and minibuses to take you to and around Shanghai.

Airports in China:

Mykolaiv International Airport

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Mykolaiv International Airport is about 56 meters or 183 feet above mean sea level and its position is 47 degrees 03′ 28″N, 031 degrees 55′ 11″E. The Airport is a public airport that serves the city of Mykolaiv in the Ukraine. The Mykolaiv International has two runways – one with an asphalt surface while the other has a grass surface. The asphalt surface runway is 8,438 feet or 2,572 meters long and the grass surface runway is 5,905 feet or 1,800 meters long.

In the whole of the South of Ukraine, the Mykolaiv International is considered one of the biggest airports. It is also recognized for the advanced and extensive technology that it is equipped with. This State owned enterprise is listed as a Class B airport, which means that all operations must be conducted by VFR (visual flight rule), IFR and SVFR flight rules. ATC is held responsible for clearing all aircraft and must separate each flight from one another. Like Mykolaiv airport in Ukraine, the whole world’s navigable airspace is basically divided into three categories and are allocated a specific class, either class A, B or C.

The Mykolaiv International Airport has a modern runway that can handle aircraft weighing as much as 220 tons when they land there. The runway can also hold a total of eight “Ilyushin IL-76” aircraft that have an array of lighting, navigation and radio technology. These strategic air lifters have four engines and were designed in the Soviet Union, although now they can be found throughout Africa, Eastern Europe and Asia. At the Air terminal complex there are about 400 passengers that go through every hour on domestic flights and only about 100 passengers coming through on international flights.

Haneda Airport (Tokyo International)

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Tokyo International Airport services the Greater Tokyo Area and deals mostly with the domestic flights. The name Haneda Airport was given to the Tokyo International Airport after the Narita International Airport was opened. The Narita International Airport was previously known as the New Tokyo International Airport, which caused some confusion. After the opening of Narita, most of Haneda’s international traffic was diverted to the new airport, thus leaving the Tokyo International Airport, concentrating mainly on the domestic traffic. Neverthless, the airport still deals with approximately 60 million passengers annually, and is therefore one of the busiest airports in the world.

The Haneda Airport was opened as the Haneda Aerodrome in 1931, and at the time, it was the biggest civilian airport in Japan. As with many airports during war time, the Haneda Aerodrome became the Haneda Army Air Base in 1945, as an United States military facility. Japan received half the airport back in 1952, which was named the Tokyo International Airport. The entire airport was given back to Japan in the year 1958. During the 1960s, airlines such as Sabena, Cathay Pacific Airways, Pan Am, Air Siam and Swissair began running frequent flights to the Haneda Airport. In 1961 the instrument landing systems were installed on the Haneda Airport runways.

Haneda Airport operates out of three Terminals. Terminal 1 is nicknamed the ‘Big Bird’, and was opened for use in 1993. The new six story building, complete with shopping areas, observation deck, banks, gift shops and other facilities, replaced the older and smaller terminal that was constructed in 1970. In December 2004, the Haneda Airport unveiled Terminal 2, which features a variety of shops, restaurants, market place and an open-air restaurant that is located on the roof. The Haneda Excel Tokyo Hotel is also situated in this amazing six-story structure. Terminal 3 is a much smaller building and is responsible for chartered, international flights that run between Haneda and the Seoul Gimpo Airport. Haneda also takes care of charter flights during the hours that Narita is not open.

Haneda Airport has three runways, which are all paved and are used for both take-off and landings. The 16R/34L is 3000 meters in length, as is the 16L/34R, with the shorter 4/22 runway being 2 500 meters in length. Transport to and from the Haneda Airport, or Tokyo International Airport, is serviced by the railway service, monorail service and buses.

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