EAA Young Eagles Take Flight

January 7, 2014 by  
Filed under Features

Since starting in 1992, the EAA Young Eagles program has given more than 1.6 million young people the opportunity to experience the thrill of flight, and continues to extend an invitation to anyone between the ages of 8 and 17 years to apply to join the ranks of EAA Young Eagles. More than 42,000 pilots in over 90 different countries are registered to participate in the program, offering the flights free of charge to approved applicants.

Before taking off, the pilot may explain a bit about the aircraft while doing a preflight inspection. Young Eagles will be told what to expect during a flight and may have the opportunity to review the aeronautical chart and identify reference points. After buckling up, the pilot will explain various functions of the instrument panel and the interior of the airplane before heading to the runway for takeoff. The flight lasts up to 20 minutes and participants are encouraged to ask questions and make observations about the experience, as pilots are keen to share their knowledge and love of flying with future aviators. Each Young Eagle receives an official logbook, signed by the pilot they flew with.

With its headquarters located in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) is an international organization that was founded in 1953 to bring together aviation enthusiasts from all walks of life. While the word “experimental” may suggest otherwise, these airplanes which have been built by individuals, are required to undergo inspection and be certified as airworthy by the FAA. With chapters in all 50 states, and a number of other countries, the EAA currently has more than 160,000 members, all of whom share a love for aviation.

Sitting alongside an experienced pilot in the cockpit of an airplane is an awesome and unforgettable experience. Most famous aviators discovered their love for flying at a young age, and the EAA Young Eagles program opens the door to the exciting world of aviation for future pilots and aviation innovators.

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